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Subs-July-2017
Subs-July-2017
Crash course on bias binding
Crash course on bias binding

Tips on binding arm and neckholes

  1. What is bias binding?

    Bias binding is a great way to finish arm and neck edges as it neatens the openings without adding bulky facings.Bindings can be attached so that they are visible on the right side of the garment as well as covering the raw edges, or can be turned to the inside completely. On sheer fabrics, narrow self fabric bindings eliminate unsightly facings showing through and are great for finishing edges on reversible garments.

  2. Made to measure

    Binding strips need to be cut on the bias, 45° to the fabric selvedge, so that they curve easily around edges without ripples. For most armholes and neck edges, a finished width of 6mm to 13mm is needed. To achieve this, you need to cut strips four times the finished width.

  3. Making your own

    First find the bias of the fabric by folding up the cut edge to lay on top of the side selvedge. Press in a crease along the diagonal fold. Unfold and draw a line along this crease. Repeat with parallel lines the width of the strips you want. Cut them out and pin right sides together so they form a right angle. Stitch together, then open out. Press, and snip off the points extending beyond the edges. Fold the long edges towards the centre and press.

  4. Attaching binding

    With right sides together, unfold one long edge of the binding and pin to the garment. Tuck the short end of the start of the strip under, then stitch in the crease of the fold until you get back to the start. Overlap about 2cm of binding. Trim the seam allowance and turn it to the inside of the garment to encase the raw edges. Slip stitch in place or stitch from the right side, catching the underside of the binding in place as you go.

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Crash course on bias binding
  • Crash course on bias binding

    Tips on binding arm and neckholes

    1. What is bias binding?

      Bias binding is a great way to finish arm and neck edges as it neatens the openings without adding bulky facings.Bindings can be attached so that they are visible on the right side of the garment as well as covering the raw edges, or can be turned to the inside completely. On sheer fabrics, narrow self fabric bindings eliminate unsightly facings showing through and are great for finishing edges on reversible garments.

    2. Made to measure

      Binding strips need to be cut on the bias, 45° to the fabric selvedge, so that they curve easily around edges without ripples. For most armholes and neck edges, a finished width of 6mm to 13mm is needed. To achieve this, you need to cut strips four times the finished width.

    3. Making your own

      First find the bias of the fabric by folding up the cut edge to lay on top of the side selvedge. Press in a crease along the diagonal fold. Unfold and draw a line along this crease. Repeat with parallel lines the width of the strips you want. Cut them out and pin right sides together so they form a right angle. Stitch together, then open out. Press, and snip off the points extending beyond the edges. Fold the long edges towards the centre and press.

    4. Attaching binding

      With right sides together, unfold one long edge of the binding and pin to the garment. Tuck the short end of the start of the strip under, then stitch in the crease of the fold until you get back to the start. Overlap about 2cm of binding. Trim the seam allowance and turn it to the inside of the garment to encase the raw edges. Slip stitch in place or stitch from the right side, catching the underside of the binding in place as you go.

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