August 2019
August 2019
How to sew surface mounted zips
How to sew surface mounted zips

So many of today’s fashions have the zip attached to the outside of the garment and now there are pretty lacy edged designs just perfect for this method of insertion.

  1. Neaten the raw edges of the seam into which the zip is to go by overlocking, overstitching or zig zag stitching. Mark the zip position on the right side of the fabric, so that the top of the zip is in line with the top of the garment (remember to allow for seam allowances). Mark the position of the bottom of the zip teeth. Set the zip aside.

  2. With right sides together, sew the seam from the hem to the bottom mark (where the zip teeth finish), back stitch to anchor the stitching, then increase the stitch length to the longest to tack the rest of the seam. Press the seam allowances open.

  3. Working from the right side of the garment, lay the zip face down over the seam just stitched, so that the lowest teeth are on the bottom mark on the fabric. Stitch across the zip tape close to the base of the teeth.

  4. Flip the zip up, so it is right side up and the bottom of the zip is now neatened, with the ends tucked underneath. Lay the zip, with the teeth centred along the tacked seam. Hand or machine tack in position.

  5. Attach a zip foot and machine stitch down the zip tape close to the teeth, catching the seam allowance underneath as you go. Finish the top edge of the garment as described in the pattern.

fb-big twitter-big email-big pin-big

More Helpful Tips...

Shape Up Your Sleeves

Shape Up Your Sleeves

Give extra shape to frocks and tops with this handy sleeve enhancement. You can easily add interest to the head of the sleeve, and how it travels over the top of the arm, simply by using tucks, gathers, pleats and darts. Each of these will require a sligh

Improve Your Rolled Hems

Improve Your Rolled Hems

Guarantee flowing hemlines that hang like a dream. Keen dressmaker Sarah Greeff has colourful memories of her first attempts at making a rolled hem. “I was first asked to make rolled hems for a colleague at Fenwick of Bond Street, a lovely Thai lady who h

Perfect Your Piping

Perfect Your Piping

Add a luxury touch to collars, sleeves and hemlines. A little well-placed piping shows that you have added love to your garment. It’s that extra effort you put into defining a beautiful seam that makes an item special. To hand-make piping, buy cord in the

Know Your Overlocking

Know Your Overlocking

Get to grips with the best overlocking finishes for everyday stitching. The overlocker has a different feel to a regular sewing machine. The trick is to let the feed dog guide the fabric. Use your right hand to support the edge of the material, taking car

Master French Seams

Master French Seams

Get to grips with a clever seam favourite for a continental finish! French seams are common in clothes for children, where the skin is extra sensitive, as the inside is completely smooth. They also create a beautiful effect on structured garments, as they

Fix a Frayed Pocket

Fix a Frayed Pocket

A quick fashion fix with Amanda Bowden's classic miracle mend. The dread of torn stitching can be traumatic. Pockets are a common site of injury for catching on things, to say nothing of natural wear and tear as hands go in and out, and even the continued